Hoot Hat – Tunisian Crochet Owl Hat Mini-Tutorial

 

HootHat

So my daughter wanted an owl hat for the winter this year.  I’ve seen lots of lovely ones out and about, so I had a good idea of what kind of look I’d like to create.  Most important for me was the ‘sticky up’ ears bit.

I came across this lovely Rowan Baby Merino Silk Double Knitting yarn in my local yarn shop and decided I’d try out Tunisian crochet, which I’d been hankering after playing with for a while.  I stole borrowed a set of Tunisian crochet hooks from Jo (these ones have a long plastic ‘tube’ attached onto the end of a traditional bamboo crochet hook, so they’re ideal for wider projects), and set about learning this lovely style.  I followed an excellent tutorial here on The Purlbee website, which is super clear and simple to follow. The texture this basic stitch creates is really rather lovely.  I love the look of the vertical lines, and it’s dense without being rigid.

Version One - not quite chunky enough for my liking!

Version One – not quite chunky enough for my liking!

 

Version one didn’t work out to be quite what I was looking for – so I wrote it off as good Tunisian practice and went back to square one with this much chunkier Rowan yarn, Felted Tweed Chunky and I love it (although I have a feeling that Rowan have discontinued this specific yarn 😦 )

P1010027

Perfect Winter hat yarn

 

The pattern is very basic and goes something like this:

  • Yarn of your choice – I used 100g of this Rowan Felted Tweed Chunky
  • Tunisian crochet hook which is 1.5 – 2 sizes bigger than that suggested on the yarn band.

 

Measure the head of the soon to be occupant of the hat and add on an inch to allow for some wiggle room.  I found that the finished article tightened up a bit from the length of the base chain, so keep measuring before you get too far in, or make yourself a handy swatch.

The hat I made was 21inches long and 16 rows (forward AND return) high.

Fold the rectangle in half to make your hat shape and slip stitch together

Fold the rectangle in half to make your hat shape and slip stitch together

Once finished, I had a lovely rectangle measuring 21inches long by 7.5 inches high.  The height here includes the small ‘curled up’ section at the bottom. At this point, it was simply a matter of joining the two short edges together using slip stitches to create a cylinder.  I then re-shaped the cylinder and squashed it flat so that the join would be in the middle of one of the sides (which would become the back of the hat) and then slip stitched along the top.

 

Lovely tassel-y ears

Lovely tassel-y ears

At this point, I added the ears, or tassels.

They’re very quick to make – there’s a picture tutorial here on Pinterest that shows you how. I’ve just pulled the strands of the chunky yarn apart to make the tassels more fluffy, and then sewed them in place.

P1010030

Smaller eyes were ditched for the bigger, orange rimmed version

 

Making the owl features

I’d already tried some smaller eyes, but Jo rightly pointed out that owls eyes are supposed to be big (doh!) – so version two of the owl eye was born.  It goes like this (make 2!) – using UK crochet terms:

 

Round 1 – Using a black / grey yarn make a magic circle and make 6 double crochet into the ring. Join with a slip stitch (6)

Round 2 – Chain 1, then 2 double crochet into each stitch from the round below (12)

Round 3 – Change to a white yarn. Chain 1, then *1 double crochet into next stitch, 2 double crochet increase in next stitch*. Repeat from * to * five more times (18)

Round 4 – 2 DC *2DC inc, 2 DC* repeat from * to* 5 times, 2DC inc (24 DC in total); (24)

Round 5 – *2DC inc, 3DC* repeat from * to * 6 times (30 DC in total)

Round 6: 3DC *2DC inc, 4DC* repeat from *to* 5 times, 2DC inc, 1DC (36 DC in total)

Round 7: – Change to orange yarn – *2DC inc, 5DC* repeat from *to* 6 times (42 DC in total)

(You’ll notice I haven’t used the traditional flat circle system for these eyes, as I find that it makes for more of a hexagonal shape – for more details on staggering where the increase goes, see Jo’s Twercle tutorial here).

Sew in ends

 

Beak

Row 1 – Chain 8

Row 2 – DC in 2nd chain from hook and DC in each, chain 1 and turn (7)

Row 3 – DC in each, chain 1 and turn (7)

Row 4 – 2DC decrease, 3 DC, 2DC decrease, chain 1 and turn (5)

Row 5 – DC in each, chain 1 and turn (5)

Row 6 – 2 DC decrease, 1 DC, 2DC decrease, chain 1 and turn (3)

Row 7 – DC in each, chain 1 and turn(3)

Row 8 – 3DC decrease (ie. hook through, yarn over into first, second and third stitches, until you have four loops on your hook, then yarn over and pull through all of them together.

Now DC all the way round the triangle you have created, inserting 3D at each corner.

Sew in ends.

P1010037

 

Now it’s simply a case of sewing all of the features in place and voila – such a quick and easy hat to make.  I’m delighted with it.

P1010046

Finished Owly face

 

Let me know any thoughts you have.  Happy hooking.

 

KareyP1010101

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Breaking Waves Crochet Cushion Tutorial

 

Rowan_Breaking_Waves_Cover


I love a trip to the seaside, and perhaps even more than Summer sunshine and ice cream trips, it’s the winter blow-away-the-cobwebs days I enjoy the most. It’s those kind of trips that have inspired this cushion – in my mind, it’s not tropical breaking waves, it’s good wintery, chilly English breaking waves on those precious days of the winter when the sun breaks through the clouds and the waves crash on the beach.

I’ve made this cushion using Rowan Felted Tweed, the colours are perfect for what I had in mind and as it’s 50% Merino Wool, 25% Alpaca and 25% Viscose it is a joy to work with.

I’d just like to say, as you’ll see if you scroll down this pattern has turned into a bit of an epic! I’ve made every effort to ensure that the instructions are correct and added diagrams and photos to help. However, if you do need any pattern support or clarification, just drop me a note (info@craftsandcofee.co.uk) and I’ll be happy to help!

To make this cushion you will need:

Rowan Felted Tweed
Seasalter (178) 50g
Scree (165) 150g
Maritime (167) 150g
Duck Egg (173) 150g
Clay (177) 50g

4mm Crochet Hook

7 Medium sized buttons

2mm clear glass beads (optional)

20 inch cushion pad

tapestry needle

This pattern is written using UK crochet terms.

Tension: On the cushion front horizontally from the peak of one wave to the next should be 8cm, and vertically 8cm is equal to 7 rows.

Cushion Front

The front of the cushion is a simple wave pattern made in treble crochet.

key and chart

Starting in Scree (165) work 102 chain.

In 5th Chain from hook (the 4 chain count as one double treble)  work 1 treble, then working along the chain work ,3 half treble, 4 double crochet, 3 half treble, 1 treble, 1 double treble.

Continue to work across the chain with the pattern *1 double treble, 1 treble, 3 half treble, 4 double crochet, 3 half treble, 1 treble, 1 double treble* repeat from * to * 5 more times.

Row A: 3 chain, turn work, and working in back loops only for the entire row work 1 treble in the back loop of the final double treble from the first row (effectively forming a 2 treble crochet increase). Then work 4 treble crochet, two 2 treble crochet decrease, 4 treble crochet, one 2 treble crochet increase.

Continue to work across the row with * one 2 treble crochet increase, 4 treble crochet, two 2 treble crochet decrease, 4 treble crochet, one 2 treble crochet increase* work from * to * 5 more times. Please note, the final 2 treble crochet increase will be worked into the back loop of the initial 4 chain. This is the right side  of the work.

Row B: 3 chain, turn work, working in front loops only for the entire row  work 1 treble in the back loop of the final double treble from the first row. Then work 4 treble crochet, two 2 Treble crochet decrease, 4 treble crochet, one 2 Treble Crochet increase.

Continue to work across the row with * one 2 treble crochet increase, 4 treble crochet, two 2 treble crochet decrease, 4 treble crochet, one 2 treble crochet increase* work from * to * 5 more times. This the back of the work.

Continue to work the cushion front following Rows A & B above – when the right side of the work is facing you, work in the back loops. When the back of the work is facing, work in the front loops.

P1000481

The wave pattern is formed and on the right side of the work the front loops of each row are available for us to work the waves into later

The colours should be worked as follows:

IMG_1615

Here are the colours of the rows for the cushion front.

Bottom Row: Scree (165)
Row1: Scree (165)
Row 2: Scree (165)
Row 3: Maritime (167)
Row 4: Maritime (167)
Row 5: Seasalter (178)
Row 6: Duck Egg (173)
Row 7: Duck Egg (173)
Row 8: Duck Egg (173)
Row 9: Seasalter (178)
Row 10: Seasalter (178)
Row 11: Clay (177)
Row 12: Maritime (167)
Row 13: Scree (165)
Row 14: Scree (165)
Row 15:  Duck Egg (173)
Row 16: Duck Egg (173)
Row 17: Seasalter (178)
Row 18: Maritime (167)
Row 19: Maritime (167)
Row 20: Maritime (167)
Row 21: Clay (177)
Row 22: Scree (165)
Row 23: Scree (165)
Row 24: Scree (165)
Row 25: Seasalter (178)
Row 26: Seasalter (178)
Row 27: Duck Egg (173)
Row 28: Duck Egg (173)
Row 29: Maritime (167)
Row 30: Maritime (167)
Row 31: Seasalter (178)
Row 32: Seasalter (178)
Row 33: Clay (177)
Row 34: Duck Egg (173)
Row 35: Duck Egg (173)
Row 36: Duck Egg (173)
Row 37: Scree (165)
Row 38: Scree (165)
Row 39: Maritime (167)
Row 40: Maritime (167)
Top Row: Maritime (167)

Normally I wouldn’t go so far in a pattern like this to suggest row by row which colours you should use. However, as the Rowan yarn is quite expensive (and therefore if you’re like me you might not want to buy an extra ball if you run out!) if you follow the rows as above and your tension is the same as mine (detailed above) you’ll have enough yarn left of each colour to work the detailing on the front of the cushion.

Once you have worked 40 rows of waves, using Maritime (167), 1 chain (does not count as first double crochet) and turn work. Work back across the row *2 double crochet, 3 half treble, 1 treble, 2 double treble, 1 treble, 3 half treble, 2 double crochet* repeat from * to * 6 more times. Cut yarn and fasten off.


P1000483

You will now have a square of waves onto which we’re going to work the detail of the raised waves from the top down as follows:

On some of these raised waves I’ve chosen to work a few clear glass beads – this is optional, so I’ll mention which rows I use them on and you can decide what you’d like to do. If you do decide to use beads, thread them onto the yarn before starting the row and then use them as you work across the row. They look best if placed randomly, so just decide for yourself how you’d like to place them.

Wave 1 (worked into the loops between the top row and row 40) Scree (165): Thread on 17 beads, attach yarn and 1 chain, work 1 double crochet into each of the loops across the cushion front.

Wave 2 (worked into the loops between row 40 and row 39) Duck Egg (173): Attach yarn, 1 chain, 1 double crochet into each of the loops across the cushion front.

Wave 3 (worked into the loops between row 39 and row 38) Seasalter (178): Attach yarn, 1 chain, 1 double crochet into each of the loops across the cushion front.


 

Now to make the raised waves slightly more ‘textured’ we’re going to start adding an increase (so, work two stitches into one of the loops) at the top and bottom of each wave.

Wave 4 (worked into the loops between row 38 and row 37) Maritime (167): Attach yarn, 1 chain, work across the row in double crochet, adding one 2DC Inc (so place two double crochet into one loop) at the top and bottom of each wave.

Wave 5 (worked into the loops between row 37 and row 36) Seasalter (178): Attach yarn, 1 chain, work across the row in double crochet, adding one 2DC Inc (so place two double crochet into one loop) at the top and bottom of each wave.

Wave 6 (worked into the loops between row 36 and row 35) Clay (177): Attach yarn, 1 chain, work across the row in double crochet, adding one increase (so place two double crochet into one loop) at the top and bottom of each wave.

Wave 7 (worked into the loops between row 35 and row 34) Scree (165): Attach yarn, 2 chain, work across the row in half trebles, adding one increase (so place two half treble crochet  into one loop) at the top and bottom of each wave.

Wave 8 (worked into the loops between row 34 and row 33) Duck Egg (173): Add beads to this wave. Attach yarn, 1 chain, work across the row in double crochet, adding one 2DC Inc (so place two double crochet into one loop) at the top and bottom of each wave.

Wave 9 (worked into the loops between row 33 and row 32) Maritime (167):  Attach yarn, 2 chain, work across the row in half trebles, adding one 2 1/2 Trble increase (so place two half treble crochet  into one loop) at the top and bottom of each wave.

Wave 10 (worked into the loops between row 32 and row 31) Duck Egg (173): Attach yarn, 1 chain, work across the row in double crochet, adding one 2DC Inc (so place two double crochet into one loop) at the top and bottom of each wave.

Wave 11 (worked into the loops between row 31 and row 30) Clay (177): Attach yarn, 2 chain, work across the row in half trebles, adding one 2 1/2 Trble increase (so place two half treble crochet  into one loop) at the top and bottom of each wave.

Wave 12 (worked into the loops between row 30 and row 29) Seasalter (178): Add beads to this wave. Attach yarn, 1 chain, work across the row in double crochet, adding one 2DC Inc (so place two double crochet into one loop) at the top and bottom of each wave.

Wave 13 (worked into the loops between row 29 and row 28) Scree (165): Attach yarn, 2 chain, work across the row in half trebles, adding one  1/2 Trble increase (so place two half treble crochet  into one loop) at the top and bottom of each wave.

Wave 14 (worked into the loops between row 28 and row 27) Maritime (167): Attach yarn, 1 chain, work across the row in double crochet, adding one 2DC Inc (so place two double crochet into one loop) at the top and bottom of each wave.


 

Now, to make the raised waves more pronounced, you will add two increases at the top and bottom of each wave. So, for example if the wave is worked in double crochet, you’ll add  2DC Inc twice at the top and bottom of each wave.

Wave 15 (worked into the loops between row 27 and row 26) Clay (177): Attach yarn, 1 chain, work across the row in double crochet, adding 2 increases at the top and bottom of each wave.

Wave 16 (worked into the loops between row 26 and row 25) Duck Egg (173) Attach yarn, 2 chain, work across the row in half treble crochet, adding 2 increases at the top and bottom of each wave.

Wave 17 (worked into the loops between row 25 and row 24) Maritime (167) Attach yarn 3 chain, work across the row in treble crochet, adding 2 increases at the top and bottom of each wave.

Wave 18(worked into the loops between row 24 and row 23) SeaSalter (178) Attach yarn, 2 chain, work across the row in half treble crochet, adding 2 increases at the top and bottom of each wave.

Wave 19 (worked into the loops between row 23 and row 22) Duck Egg (173) Attach yarn, 1 chain, work across the row in double crochet, adding 2 increases at the top and bottom of each wave.

Wave 20 (worked into the loops between row 22 and row 21) Maritime (167) Attach yarn, 2 chain, work across the row in half treble crochet, adding 2 increases at the top and bottom of each wave.

Wave 21 (worked into the loops between row 21 and row 20) Clay (177)  Attach yarn 3 chain, work across the row in treble crochet, adding 2 increases at the top and bottom of each wave.

Wave 22 (worked into the loops between row 20 and row 19) Scree (165) Add beads on this wave. Attach yarn, 2 chain, work across the row in half treble crochet, adding 2 increases at the top and bottom of each wave.

Wave 23 (worked into the loops between row 19 and row 18) Seasalter (178) Attach yarn, 1 chain, work across the row in double crochet, adding 2 increases at the top and bottom of each wave.

Wave 24(worked into the loops between row 18 and row 17) Duck Egg (173) Attach yarn, 2 chain, work across the row in half treble crochet, adding 2 increases at the top and bottom of each wave.

Wave  25(worked into the loops between row 1 7 and row 16) Maritime (167) Attach yarn 3 chain, work across the row in treble crochet, adding 2 increases at the top and bottom of each wave.

Wave 26(worked into the loops between row 16 and row 15) Seasalter (178) Attach yarn, 2 chain, work across the row in half treble crochet, adding 2 increases at the top and bottom of each wave.

Wave 27 (worked into the loops between row 15 and row 14) Clay (177)Attach yarn, 1 chain, work across the row in double crochet, adding 2 increases at the top and bottom of each wave.

Wave 28 (worked into the loops between row 14 and row 13) Duck Egg (173) Attach yarn, 2 chain, work across the row in half treble crochet, adding 2 increases at the top and bottom of each wave.


Now we’re going to add the breaking waves. This can sound a little tricky, but all you’re going to be doing is working across the waves in double crochet including the increases at the top and bottom of each wave as you have been doing above. Into these waves of double crochet we’ll be adding swirls to create the breaking waves.

There are two different positions along the waves that we’re going to add the swirls that create the breaking waves.

IMG_1629

Position 1 is adding a wave in the middle of the straight side of each wave (i.e. between the top and bottom of each wave) as indicated by the ‘1’ in the diagram below.

Position 2 is adding a wave at the top and bottom of each wave, between the increase stitches (i.e. at the top and bottom of each wave) as indicated by the ‘2’ in the diagram below.

position of spirals

Add the spirals in the positions indicated above.

5 Chain swirl: 5 chain, 3DC into 2nd chain from hook, 3 DC into each of the remaining 3 chain.
6 Chain swirl: 6 chain, 3DC into 2nd chain from hook, 3 DC into each of the remaining 4 chain.
8 Chain swirl: 8 chain, 3DC into 2nd chain from hook, 3DC into each of the remaining 6 chain.

 

Wave 29 (worked into the loops between row 13 and row 12) Seasalter (178) Attach yarn, 1 chain, work across the row in double crochet, adding 2 increases at the top and bottom of each wave, add one 5 chain swirl in each position 1.

Wave  30 (worked into the loops between row 12 and row 11) Maritime (167) Attach yarn, 1 chain, work across the row in double crochet, adding 2 increases at the top and bottom of each wave, add one 5 chain swirl in each position 2.

Wave 31 (worked into the loops between row 11 and row 10) Duck Egg (173) Attach yarn, 1 chain, work across the row in double crochet, adding 2 increases at the top and bottom of each wave, add one 5 chain swirl in each position 1.

Wave 32 (worked into the loops between row 10 and row 9) Scree (165) Attach yarn, 1 chain, work across the row in double crochet, adding 2 increases at the top and bottom of each wave, add one 6 chain swirl in each position 2.

Wave 33 (worked into the loops between row 9 and row 8) Clay (177)Attach yarn, 1 chain, work across the row in double crochet, adding 2 increases at the top and bottom of each wave, add one 6 chain swirl in each position 1 & 2.

Wave 34 (worked into the loops between row 8 and row 7) Scree (165)Attach yarn, 1 chain, work across the row in double crochet, adding 2 increases at the top and bottom of each wave, add one 6 chain swirl in each position 1 & 2.

Wave 35 (worked into the loops between row 7 and row 6) Clay (177)Attach yarn, 1 chain, work across the row in double crochet, adding 2 increases at the top and bottom of each wave, add one 8 chain swirl in each position 1 & 2.

Wave 36 (worked into the loops between row 6 and row 5) Clay (177)Attach yarn, 1 chain, work across the row in double crochet, adding 2 increases at the top and bottom of each wave, add one 8 chain swirl in each position 1 & 2.

Wave 37 (worked into the loops between row 5 and row 4) Scree (165)Attach yarn, 1 chain, work across the row in double crochet, adding 2 increases at the top and bottom of each wave, add one 6 chain swirl in each position 1.

Wave 38 (worked into the loops between row 4 and row 3) Duck Egg (173)Attach yarn, 1 chain, work across the row in double crochet, adding 2 increases at the top and bottom of each wave, add one 6 chain swirl in each position 2.

Wave 39 (worked into the loops between row 3 and row 2) Maritime (167)Attach yarn, 1 chain, work across the row in double crochet, adding 2 increases at the top and bottom of each wave, add one 5 chain swirl in each position 1.

Wave 40 (worked into the loops between row 2 and row 1) Seasalter (178)Attach yarn, 1 chain, work across the row in double crochet, adding 2 increases at the top and bottom of each wave, add one 5 chain swirl in each position 2.


 

Cushion Back

IMG_1645

The cushion back is worked in waves of Scree (165) and Maritime (167)

Starting in Scree (165) work 102 chain.

In 5th Chain from hook (the 4 chain count as your first double treble) work 1 treble, then working along the chain work 3 half treble, 4 double crochet, 3 half treble, 1 treble, 1 double treble.

Continue to work across the chain with the pattern *1 double treble, 1 treble, 3 half treble, 4 double crochet, 3 half treble, 1 treble, 1 double treble* repeat from * to * 5 more times.

3 chain, turn work,  1 treble into same stitch, then work 4 treble crochet, two 2 treble crochet decrease, 4 treble crochet, one 2 treble crochet increase.

Continue to work across the row with * one 2 treble crochet increase, 4 treble crochet, two 2 treble crochet decrease, 4 treble crochet, one 2 treble crochet increase* work from * to * 5 more times. Please note that the last 2 treble crochet increase will be worked into the 4th of the initial 4 chain.

Change to Maritime (167)

3 chain, turn work,  1 treble in the same stitch, then work 4 treble crochet, two 2 treble crochet decrease, 4 treble crochet, one 2 treble crochet increase.

Continue to work across the row with * one 2 treble crochet increase, 4 treble crochet, two 2 treble crochet decrease, 4 treble crochet, one 2 treble crochet increase* work from * to * 5 more times. This the back of the work.

Work up the back of the cushion, with 2 rows of each colour until you have 41 rows and keeping the Scree (165) yarn attached work:

1 chain (does not count as first double crochet) and turn work. Work back across the row *2 double crochet, 3 half treble, 1 treble, 2 double treble, 1 treble, 3 half treble, 2 double crochet* repeat from * to * 6 more times. Cut yarn and fasten off.

Next you’ll need to make the button band. The band is worked in stripes of double crochet using up scrap yarn from the front of the cushion – so use up your scraps, working 1 row in each colour.

 

IMG_1644

Work 101 chain. 1 DC in 2nd Chain from hook, work 1 DC in each chain.

1 chain, turn.

Change colour, 1 DC into each DC from the previous row, 1 chain, turn.
Change colour, 1 DC into each DC from the previous row, 1 chain, turn.
Now to make the button holes:
6DC, 3 chain, skip 3DC, *11 DC, 3 chain, skip 3DC* repeat from * to * 5 more times, 5dc, 1 chain, turn.
Change colour, 1 DC into each DC from the previous row. Each time you come to a button hole, work 3 DC into the 3 chain space, 1 chain, turn.
Change colour, 1 DC into each DC from the previous row, 1 chain, turn.
Change colour, 1 DC into each DC from the previous row, 1 chain, turn.

Change colour to Scree (165)

4 chain (counts as your first double treble), 1 treble, then working along the chain work 3 half treble, 4 double crochet, 3 half treble, 1 treble, 1 double treble.

Continue to work across the chain with the pattern *1 double treble, 1 treble, 3 half treble, 4 double crochet, 3 half treble, 1 treble, 1 double treble* repeat from * to * 5 more times.

Continue to work 2 rows of waves in Maritime, 2 in Scree, 2 in maritime and then the final row in Scree should be worked as follows:

1 chain, turn, work back across the row *2 double crochet, 3 half treble, 1 treble, 2 double treble, 1 treble, 3 half treble, 2 double crochet* repeat from * to * 6 more times. Cut yarn and fasten off.

Making the Cushion

Sew in all loose ends of yarn (this can take some time – settle down with a cup of tea and turn on the radio!)

Lay the main part of the cushion back onto the wrong side of the cushion front and stitch down the sides and across the base.

Lay the smaller part of the cushion back onto the wrong side of the cushion front (so that the button band overlaps with the main part of the cushion back). Stitch the two short sides and across the top.

Stitch on the buttons so that they correspond with the button holes.

Add the cushion pad and you’re done!

 

main_for_collage_cropped2

 

Tiny Crochet Hats

IMG_8256

So the weather has most definitely turned here in the UK.  We’ve had a wonderful, long Summer – but the heating has now gone on and the logs have been delivered to keep the wood burner going over the Winter.  And while it’s a shame to see the cold coming in, it’s also a great excuse to get more yarny loveliness on the go – knowing that it will come in handy pretty soon.

The last couple of days I’ve been playing around with hats.  Mainly because one of my wonderful friends in the states has just had a baby girl and I wanted to send over something handmade and (hopefully) useful!  So, here are the two I came up with.  What do you think?

I really wanted to stay away from pink for some reason – having had a girl and been overwhelmed with the pinkness of all baby girl clothes I suppose.

Here’s the pattern for the dark green hat – and I’ll work on the light green one soon:

This pattern uses UK terms.

IMG_8244

You will need:

  • 30g of your chosen double knitting yarn
  • scrap of alternative colour for flower
  • button
  • 4mm hook
  • tapestry needle for sewing in ends and attaching flower / button

The finished hat measures 14 inches in diameter and is 5.5 inches high – but is very flexible and will ‘grow’ by a good couple of inches in width.  It really is very quick to make – a lovely project for a day when you have some spare time. Effectively we are going to make a flat circle with a starting number of 10 trebles. Here’s the explanation below if you’re not familiar with how this works: (Note: if you want to make the hat bigger, simply carry on increasing until you have a diameter you want, then work rows without increases until the desired height)

Please note, this pattern uses UK crochet terms and the number in brackets at the end of each line is the total number of stitches for that round.

  • chain 4 and join into a loop using a slip stitch.
  • chain 3 (counts as first treble), then make 9 more trebles into the central loop. Slip stitch into the 3rd of the initial 3 chain to join. (10)
  • chain 3 (counts as first treble), make one more treble into same space, then 2 trebles into each stitch from the previous round. Slip stitch into the 3rd of the initial 3 chain to join (20)
  • chain 3, 2 tr into next stitch, then *1 tr into next stitch, 2 tr into next stitch*, repeat  from * to * 8 more times. Slip stitch into the 3rd of the initial 3 chain to join. (30)
  • chain 3, 1 tr in next stitch, 2 tr in next stitch, then *1 tr, 1 tr, 2 tr*, repeat from * to * 8 more times. Slip stitch into the 3rd of the initial 3 chain to join. (40)
  • chain 3, 1 tr in next 2 stitches, 2 tr in next stitch, then *1 tr, 1 tr, 1 tr, 2 tr*, repeat from * to * 8 more times. Slip stitch into the 3rd of the initial 3 chain to join. (50)
  • chain 3, 1 tr in next 3 stitches, 2 tr in next stitch, then *1 tr, 1 tr, 1 tr, 1 tr, 2tr*, repeat from * to * 8 more times. Slip stitch into the 3rd of the initial 3 chain to join. (60)

At this point, my circle measured around 4.5 inches across. From now on, you can work one treble into every stitch and start to work on the height of the hat. From this point onward, I added 10 more rows. Start each round with 3 chain which counts as your first treble, and end each round with a slip stitch into the 3rd of these initial 3 chain.

IMG_8257

To make the edging for the hat, I’ve used crab stitch, which is such a lovely neat way to finish off I think.  Crab stitch is basically a normal double crochet but worked backwards (i.e. in the opposite direction).  Now while I know that can sound confusing, it’s actually very easy once you get your head round it. There’s a great video from All Free Crochet here for instructions on crab stitch.

Once you’ve finished your edging, sew in your ends and make a flower to add a little interest.

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Making the Flower:

  • In the contrasting colour, chain 4 and join into a loop using a slip stitch
  • 1 chain, work 6 double crochet into the loop and join using a slip stitch into the initial chain (6)
  • chain 1 and work 2 double crochet into each stitch from the round below. Slip stitch to join (12)
  • To make the front petals, we are going to work into the front loops only, leaving the back loops free to help form the back petals. (See here for Jo’s explanation on how to identify back and front loops)
  • Slip stitch along to the next stitch, then make 5 trebles into the next stitch along to form your first petal
  • Slip stitch into the next stitch, which will help define the petal
  • *make 5 trebles into the next stitch, then slip stitch into the next*. Continue from * to * until you have made 6 petals and are back to where you started. Join with a slip stitch.
  • Now, to make the back petals change the yarn to the same yarn as you’ve used for the main hat. Turn your flower over and identify the back loops from the round below which you left when you formed the front petals.
  • Working into these back loops, work *1 double crochet in the first back loop, then 2 double crochet in the next back loop*, repeating from * to * 5 more times. Slip stitch to join (18)
  • Now, slip stitch along to the next stitch. Make 7 trebles into the next stitch to form your first petal.
  • Slip stitch into the next two stitches
  • *make 7 trebles into the next stitch, then slip stitch into the next 2*. Continue from * to * until you have made your 6 petals. Join with a slip stitch.

Now you can select a button and sew the flower and button onto the hat.

If you have any questions or comments, please do let me know.

Time to sit back, admire your lovely, cute hat and have a cup of tea!

Hope you enjoy

KB

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Crochet Graph Cushion – Tutorial

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I’ve long had a fascination with mathematical ‘shapes’ and I had an idea a while ago that I’d love to represent something mathematical in crochet (which I find follows so many of the same mathematical rules).  So, in my head I kept grinning over the idea of a crochet graph, which started to turn into a reality a couple of months ago and eventually this cushion was born. As my week progresses, the need for cake increases and thus the idea was complete.  I LOVE the colours, and I’m so pleased with the finished cushion.  Crochet is just the most versatile medium I love the fact that you can make something that looks so very precise like this cushion or that looks (deceptively) far more random like Jo’s Wiggly cushion here.

Which kind of crochet do you prefer?  If you have any comments or thoughts, do let us know here.

I used an orange palate for this cushion (details of colours used below), but that’s only because it matches the curtains in my living room.  You could easily adjust this concept to any number of graph bars or any colours that suit you.

Lots of lovely colours

Sunset colours

You will need:

  • Drops Muskat – Black (17) – small length for the graph axis
  • Drops Muskat – Light Grey (19) – 200g

then – in order from right to left

  • Drops Muskat – Bordeaux (41) – 50g
  • Drops Muskat – Rust (21) – 50g
  • Drops Muskat – Orange (47) – 50g
  • Drops Muskat – Dark Orange (49) – 50g
  • Drops Muskat – Warm Yellow (51) – 50g
  • Drops Muskat – Vanilla Yellow (30) – 50g
  • Drops Muskat – Light Yellow (07) – 50g
  • 4mm hook
  • cushion pad (I used 45cm square cushion as I wanted it to be nice and firm)

The yarn was all purchased from http://www.woolwarehouse.co.uk/

This pattern is written using UK crochet terms.

Tension: working in rows of double crochet with a 4mm hook 5cm = 12 stitches wide x 12 stitches high – My stitches do tend to be quite tight, so do check your tension before you start. This pattern makes a cushion which is 40cm square.

Making the graph

I made the graph square in double crochet, using the diagram below as a guide for the colour change. Each square of the diagram represents 3DC wide by 3DC high. You really could make the graph bars whatever height you like, but I like the ‘stepping down’ look I’ve created.

Each square represents a 3DC square

Each square represents a 3DC square

The graph panel is going to be 72 stitches wide by 72 rows high. However, in order to make the colour change as easy as possible, we are going to work the whole panel sideways from the right of the chart to the left. That way, we only need to concentrate on one graph bar colour at a time.

To start, work a chain of 73 stitches long in the Light Grey yarn. This will be the right hand edge of the diagram above.

Starting in the 2nd chain from the hook, work 1 double crochet in each chain along.
At the end of the row, work 1 chain and turn.

*1 DC in each of the 72 DC from the previous row, 1ch, turn* work from * to * 5 times so that you have 6 DC rows in Light Grey.

On the next row, we are going to introduce our first graph bar.

DC 5 in the Light Grey, on the 6th DC, yarn over and hook a loop through (see 1. below), then switch to your new graph bar colour (see 2. below), using the new colour to complete the stitch (see 3 below).

You will need to carry along the Light Grey yarn that you’re not using, forming the double crochet stitches over the top of it (see 4. below). This has the advantage of making both the front and the back of the work very neat, and means there are significantly less joins to make. To be sure that the work is an even texture, pull the yarn that you are carrying tight as you go.  (There are more detailed pictures of how to do this colour change on Jo’s Monster Maze Cushion here)

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I’ve left an area of Light Grey at the bottom of my graph, so that the axis lines and labels have some space.  However, I chose not to carry the bar graph colour through the grey, instead leaving it ‘hanging’ on the last stitch and picking it back up again (using the method above) when I got back up to the right stitch. REMEMBER, you need to change the colour on the stitch BEFORE the new colour block starts (see 1. below)!

IMG_1579

Leave the yarn for the block colour at the point that you change to the Light Grey (see 2. below), then carry on in the Light Grey to the end of the row (see 3. below). Chain up and turn your work, making DC’s up to the stitch before you change back to your colour (see 4. below, where you can also see the Orange yarn waiting for you!). Use the block colour to finish the stitch before the block starts, simply picking it up from where it’s waiting (see 5. below). Then just carry on using the Orange yarn and carrying the grey with you as before (see 6. below).

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Carry on using this method to create all of the other graph bars, leaving 3 rows of Light Grey inbetween each one, and six rows to finish off after the last graph bar colour.  Once you are done, crochet a row of DC all the way round the panel to create a frame and neaten it all up. I then carried on creating a frame in DC using two rows of Orange, one row of Light Grey and two rows of Warm Yellow.

To finish the front, you now simply need to add in the axis lines and sew on the labels.

The axis lines are made in Black by making stitches onto the top of your work. Hold the black yarn at the back of your work, and insert your hook and pull through a loop, then move your hook to the next stitch along, insert and pull through another loop, continuing to pull it through the first (effectively creating a line of slip stitches). Work this line to the correct height, then using a tapestry needle, create the arrow at the end and fasten off.

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The labels I’ve used here were from Nicollie, who makes some wonderful hand made leather tags, bracelets (with crochet hooks attached!!) and keyrings and was happy to accommodate my wording requests. Please check our her shop here!

Making the back of the cushion

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So, this is where the fun starts 🙂 The only rule is to work a panel which is 72 DC wide, by 72 rows high.  I really just had fun and changed colours randomly, bearing in mind that I needed to keep enough of the ‘framing’ colours (Ornage, Light Grey, Warm Yellow) to complete the frame on the back to match the front.

Once the back panel is made add the same border as you did the front panel (two rows of DC Orange, one row of Light Grey and two rows of Warm Yellow). Then simply lay the two sides together and slip stitch around the edge, inserting your cushion pad once you have three sides attached.

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Slip Stitch the front to the back

Now sit back, enjoy your lovely work and have a well deserved cup of tea!

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Monster Maze Crochet Cushion Tutorial

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I made this Monster Maze cushion for my boys.  I used Drops Cotton Light which is perfect for the summer and has worked up with a nice firm texture which is great for a kids project. The aim is for little fingers to be able to trace the maze around the cushion – taking care to avoid the lurking monsters!

We’d love to know what you think! Leave us a comment here.

You Will Need:

  • Drops Cotton Light – Jeans Blue (26) 300g
  • Drops Cotton Light – Green (11) 200g
  • Drops Cotton Light – Yellow (28) 50g
  • 4.5mm & 4mm Hooks
  • 10 Buttons to decorate (more details in how I made these below).
  • A 45 x 45cm Cushion Pad.

The yarn was all purchased from http://www.woolwarehouse.co.uk/

This pattern is written using UK crochet terms.

Tension: Working in rows of double crochet with a 4.5mm hook 5cm = 10 stitches wide by 10 rows high. If your tension is different from this, change your hook size to suit.

The Maze Panel

Maze_Grid_Pattern

Each square in the grid represents one double crochet.

The maze panel is worked in rows of double crochet, using a 4.5mm hook

The panel is going to be 72 stitches wide by 72 rows high. To start, work a chain of 73 stitches long in the Jeans Blue yarn.

Starting in the 2nd chain from the hook, work 1 double crochet in each chain.
At the end of the row, work 1 chain and turn.

*1 DC in each of the 72 DC from the previous row, 1ch, turn* work from * to * 3 times so that you have 4 rows in the Jeans Blue.

You may notice that I’m not treating the 1ch as the first double crochet in the row – this is just because I don’t like working this way, I always find it tricky to work into the chain stitch and so I’ve now decided to throw caution to the wind and not bother! I simply do a chain at the end of each row to turn the work and get me into the right place, then work a double crochet into each double crochet from the previous row. I know it’s not how it’s done ‘properly’ but I find it easier, so it’s the method I use 🙂

You now need to start working from the grid using both the Jeans blue and the Green yarn. Each square on the grid represents 1 DC stitch.

How to Change Colour

Changing colour when working in double crochet is very easy – you just need to remember a couple of things. The first thing is that the stitch BEFORE the new colour is important – work your double crochet as normal (hook into stitch, yarn over hook and bring through a loop) but change colour now, so that you do the final yarn over hook and pull through in the new colour.

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Work the first half of the stitch as normal

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This is my last green double crochet before I swap to blue. I’ve inserted the hook into the stitch below and pulled through one loop of the green – giving me two green loops on the hook

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Now rather than looping round the green yarn as I would on a ‘normal’ stitch, to change colours I hook the blue yarn.

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Now you’ll finish the stitch with a blue loop on your hook and you’ll get a neat colour change.

The second thing for this pattern is that I have carried along the yarn colour that I’m not using, forming the double crochet stitches over the top of the yarn colour that isn’t in use. This has the advantage of making both the front and the back of the work very neat, and adding extra weight to the finished panel. To make sure that the work is an even texture, make sure that yarn that you are carrying is kept taut.

To carry the yarn along, when the hook goes into the stitch, the yarn to be carried needs to be laying over the hook.

To carry the yarn along, when the hook goes into the stitch, the yarn to be carried needs to be laying over the hook.

Work the double crochet as usual.

Work the double crochet as usual.

The green double crochet stitches are worked as normal and the blue yarn is carried along ready for when you need it.

The green double crochet stitches are worked as normal and the blue yarn is carried along ready for when you need it.

Using the grid, work across the even number rows from right to left and the odd number rows from left to right.

As you are carrying the yarn colour you’re not using with you, you’ll find that when you reach the end of a row you have the blue yarn that is in use and the green yarn too. Just make 1 chain, turn the work and then continue to work in the blue, encasing the green yarn in the stitches as you work.

Continue to work up the grid, finishing with the last 4 rows in blue – there is no need to carry the green yarn through these last rows as you will not need it again.

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Edging the maze pattern.

To edge the maze pattern in yellow, using a 4mm hook, hold the yellow wool at the back of the panel, insert the hook and pull through a loop, insert the hook again 1 stitch further along and pull through a second loop. Pull the second loop through the first one and continue.

Well done – you’ve finished the difficult part!

The Cushion Back

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Simple stripes for the cushion back.

The cushion back is worked in stripes of double crochet, to save having to sew in lots of ends, carry the colours up the side of the panel – they’ll be hidden when you work the edging round.

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Carrying the yarn neatly up the side of the back panel saves having to sew in lots of ends!

73 Ch, DC into 2nd Chain from hook, work 1 DC into each chain.

1CH, turn work, 72 DC

Change colour to green yarn.

*1CH, turn work, 72 DC* work from *t0* 2 times

Chaing colur to blue yarn.

*1CH, turn work, 72 DC* work from *t0* 2 times

Continue to work rows of stripes until you have 72 rows.

The Edging

The edging is worked in the same way for both the front and back panels.

With the right side of the panel facing you, attach the blue yarn at any point along the side of the panel and work 1 CH.  Along the sides, work 1 DC into each row and at the top and bottom work 1 DC into each DC from the panel. At every corner work 2CH. Slip stitch into initial CH to finish the round.

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First round of edging along the side of the back panel

Attach green yarn, 1 CH and continue to work 1DC into each DC from the previous round. At the corners work 1DC, 2CH, 1DC into the 2CH space. Finish round with a slip stitch into the initial 1 CH

Attach Blue yarn and continue to work 4 more rows of edging in the same way as above – 1DC in each DC from the previous round with 1DC, 2CH, 1DC into each 2 CH corner space. Finish round with a slip stitch into the initial chain of that round and fasten off yarn.

The yellow outline is worked in the same way as on the front panel. Work the yellow following the line that marks the edge of the panel and the start of the border.

Make the border in the same way for both the front and back panel.

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Add the yellow where the panel meets the edging.

Add the Buttons!

I decided that to make my maze cushion more fun, I should add monster buttons to lurk in the dead ends (thanks to Karey for that inspiration!). Being me, I decided to make buttons out of Fimo (polymer clay), but you could buy pre-made buttons (try somewhere like this http://www.beadandbuttoncompany.co.uk/) or just go for regular brightly coloured buttons.

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Fimo monster buttons!

I went for an arrow button for the top left to mark the start, a chequered flag for the finish and little green and blue beasties for along the way. I normally only play with Fimo with my kids, so I’m certainly lacking some skills, but the results are quite cute. From what I’ve read on the web, it’s fine to machine wash fimo buttons – but if you are in any doubt, remove them before washing.

To Finish

To finish off the cushion, sew in all the ends and sew the buttons into place.

With right sides facing out, lay the cushion front onto the back. Attach the yarn and line up the edges, holding the front panel facing you. DC to fasten the two panels together – lining up the stitches and catching the back loop of the stitch from the front panel and the front loop of the corresponding stitch on the back panel.

I decided to attach the front to the back using double crochet and as I’m using a polyester cushion pad if it ever needs to go into the wash I can either just pull back the row of DC that joins the front to the back or be lazy (which has been known in the past) and put the entire thing, cover and pad into the washing machine.

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The row of double crochet makes a nice neat join.

Well done – you’re all finished, make yourself a cup of tea and sit back to enjoy what you’ve created.

We’d love to hear what you think, or if you need any pattern support please do leave a comment here.

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Crochet Edged Coaster Tutorial

We have been working on this pretty crochet edging project for one of our workshops. Crochet edging can be used on anything from coasters (which we will make today) to clothes. We have four different styles of edging for you to choose from.

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To make 4 coasters you will need:

  • 2.5mm hook
  • 4ply cotton
  • large eye tapestry needle
  • For every coaster you’ll need two squares of fabric 20 x 20cm;
  • A 20 x 20cm square of ‘Heat n’ Bond’ Lite;
  • A tailors awl or other sharp pointy object to puncture holes.

Stitches used (patterns use UK terms):

  • Chain (ch)
  • Double crochet (dc)
  • Treble crochet (tr)
  • Slip Stitch (ss)

A note on tension! If the edging is looking too loose and is not laying flat, try using a smaller hook.

Key for diagrams

Key for diagrams

Coasters

Preparing the Fabric Base

To make the base of the coasters, we’re using a 20 x 20cm sample of upholstery fabric. You can use any type of fabric you like, but firm cottons fabrics are ideal. You’ll also need a thinner backing fabric and a square of ‘Heat n’ Bond’ or similar iron-on adhesive.

Following the instructions on the Heat n’ Bond, fuse the two layers of fabric together. This has the advantage of stopping the coasters from fraying and gives the fabrics a thicker more sturdy feel.

 

Attach the upholstery fabric to the backing fabric using Heat n Bond

Attach the upholstery fabric to the backing fabric using Heat n Bond

Once you’ve fused together the fabric squares, either use scissors or a rotary cutter to neaten the edges and cut the large square into four 10 x 10 cm squares.

 

Use a rotary cutter to cut the fabric into 10cm x 10cm squares - scissors will do just as well!

Use a rotary cutter to cut the fabric into 10cm x 10cm squares – scissors will do just as well

Turn the coaster over and on the back using a heat erasable pen (we use Fixion pens from Pilot) mark lines 1cm from the edge. Then with a ruler, mark along the lines at 1cm intervals.

Next, placing the coaster onto a chopping board or similar (otherwise, trust me, you make a neat set of holes in your table!) and use a tailors awl to make holes at each of your marks. When you’ve made all the holes, carefully either use an iron or a hair drier to erase the pen.

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Using a heat erasable pen and tailors awl to create the sewing holes

Blanket Stitch

The next step is to use the holes you’ve just created to work a round of blanket stitch around the coaster. Take care at the corners to make sure they are neat, following as in the photograph below.

Once you’ve worked all the way around the coaster with blanket stitch it should look like this. Cut off the yarn and tie ends then weave in at the back of the coaster.

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Blanket stitch all the way around your coaster.

 

Round 1 for all designs

Each of the four designs starts with a round of double crochet.

  • Join your yarn to the blanket stitch running along the edge of your work, work 1 ch (which counts as your first double crochet);
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Loop under the blanket stitch and attach the yarn to start crocheting.

  • 3dc in each blanket stitch space along the edges
  • For each corner make 4dc in each side of the corner, allowing extra stitches will help the corners to lay flat.
  • To finish, join with a slip stitch into the initial 1 ch.

Your coaster should then look like this.P1030092

Chain Loop Edging

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Pretty chain loop edging

Round 2

Work Round 1 in double crochet, as detailed above.

  • *Ch 5, skip 2 dc from below, dc in next space* repeat from * to * until reaching the corner. At the corner work 6 ch and skip 3 DC twice. Then continue to work from * to * until the corners, where you work 6 ch and skip 3 DC twice as above.
  • Repeat all the way round, to finish join with a slip stitch into the 1st chain.

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Pretty flowers because they make me happy!

Shell Edging

As with all the coasters, work round 1 in DC as detailed above.

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Classic shell edging

Round 2

Each shell ‘cluster’ takes up 2 blanket stitch sections, so make sure that you start an odd number of blanket stitch spaces away from a corner.

  • Make 1 ch, and dc in the same space
  • *Skip 2, Make 7 tr in next dc from Round 1, Skip 2, dc in next*
  • Repeat from * to * for the straight edges;

For the corners: Skip 3dc from Round 1, then make 11tr in the next dc, skip 3, dc in next. This will create the fan like shape all the way round the corner.

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Working treble crochet stitches to make the shell edging

Granny Edging 

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Simple granny edging is very pretty.

Round 2

As with all the coasters, the first round is worked into the blanket stitches in double crochet, as detailed above.

  • 3ch, this counts as your first treble, make 2 more tr into same space, skip 2 dc
  • *3tr, skip 2 dc*
  • Repeat from *to* until reaching a corner.
  • Corners! – make 3tr in the 4th dc of corner, 2ch, then 3 tr in first dc of next side.

Finish the round with a slip stitch into 3rd of your initial 3 chain.

Round 3

On this round you continue to work 3 treble clusters into the treble spaces you created in round two.

  • 3ch, this counts as your first treble, turn your work so that you now have the back of the coaster facing you and make 2 more tr into tr space from Round 2.
  • 3tr into next tr space – repeat to corner
  • Corners! – make 3 tr into chain space from Round 1, ch 2, then 3 more treble into same chain space.
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Granny edging

 Picot Edging

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Picot edging would be perfect for lots of projects.

As with all the coasters, the first round is worked into the blanket stitches in double crochet, as detailed above.

  • 1 Chain (counts as your first DC), 1DC into next 2 DC from round 1. *3Ch, 3DC* repeat from * to * until corner.
  • At corner, work 4DC , 3 CH, 4 DC then revert to working from * to * until next corner.
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Work around the coaster creating picots as you go

We hope you have fun with your edging! If you have any questions or need any pattern support please do contact us here.

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Textured Flower Cushion Tutorial

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I’m lucky enough to live near the beautiful gardens at RHS Wisley in Surrey – and at this time of year, even if the flowers in my own garden aren’t up to standard the beautiful blooms at Wisley always cheer me up. I created this cushion inspired by the big pom pom heads of peonies trying to bring a bit of their unstructured shaggy loveliness into my living room. Please do let us know what you think by leaving a comment here.

This Cushion Uses

200g Rowan Creative Focus Worsted in New Fern (SH01265) 200g Rowan Creative Focus Worsted in Deep Rose (SH02755) 5mm and 4mm Crochet Hook 16 inch Cushion Pad Stitch Markers 5 Buttons This pattern uses UK Crochet Terms

Cushion Front & Back

The cushion front is worked as a spiral, working in the back loops to leave the front loops free for you to create the flower petals. It is important to use a stitch marker to mark the last stitch of every round – otherwise it’s easy to loose where you are. For the first 31 rounds the front and back are made in the same way. Abbreviations CH – Chain DC – Double Crochet 2DC Inc – 2 Double Crochet increase, so work 2 DC into one DC from the previous round

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Working into the back loops only leaves the front loops available to add the petals later

Using the New Fern yarn and a 5mm hook. 

Magic Circle, 1 Chain

Round 1: 6DC into magic circle;

***Work Only In Back Loops From Now On***

Round 2: 2 DC inc into each DC from Round 1 (12 DC in total);

Round 3: *2 DC inc, 1 DC* repeat from * to* 6 times (18 DC in total);

Round 4: 2 DC *2DC inc, 2 DC* repeat from * to* 5 times, 2DC inc (24 DC in total);

Round 5: *2DC inc, 3DC* repeat from * to * 6 times (30 DC in total)

Round 6: 3DC *2DC inc, 4DC* repeat from *to* 5 times, 2DC inc, 1DC (36 DC in total)

Round 7: *2DC inc, 5DC* repeat from *to* 6 times (42 DC in total)

Round 8: 4DC *2DC inc, 6DC* repeat from * to* 5 times, 2DC Inc, 2DC (48 DC in total)

Round 9: *2DC inc, 7DC* repeat from *to* 6 times (54 Stitches in total)

Round 10: 5DC *2DC inc, 8DC* repeat from * to* 5 times, 2DC Inc, 3DC (60 DC in total)

Round 11: *2 DC inc, 9 DC* repeat from * to* 6 times (66 DC in total);

Round 12: 6DC *2DC inc, 10DC* repeat from * to* 5 times, 2DC Inc, 4DC  (72 DC in total)

Round 13: *2 DC inc, 11 DC* repeat from * to* 6 times (78DC in total);

Round 14: 7DC *2DC inc, 12DC* repeat from * to* 5 times, 2DC Inc, 5DC  (84 DC in total)

Round 15: *2 DC inc, 13DC* repeat from * to* 6 times (90 DC in total);

Round 16: 8DC *2DC inc, 14DC* repeat from * to* 5 times, 2DC Inc, 6DC  (96 DC in total)

Round 17: *2 DC inc, 15 DC* repeat from * to* 6 times (102 DC in total);

Round 18: 9DC *2DC inc, 16DC* repeat from * to* 5 times, 2DC Inc, 7DC  (108 DC in total)

Round 19: *2 DC inc, 17 DC* repeat from * to* 6 times (114 DC in total);

Round 20: 10DC *2DC inc, 18DC* repeat from * to* 5 times, 2DC Inc, 8DC  (120 DC in total)

Round 21: *2 DC inc, 19 DC* repeat from * to* 6 times (126 DC in total);

Round 22: 11DC *2DC inc, 20DC* repeat from * to* 5 times, 2DC Inc, 9DC   (132 DC in total)

Round 23: *2 DC inc, 21 DC* repeat from * to* 6 times (138 DC in total);

Round 24: 12DC *2DC inc, 22DC* repeat from * to* 5 times,2DC Inc, 10DC  (144 DC in total)

Round 25: *2 DC inc, 23 DC* repeat from * to* 6 times (150 DC in total);

Round 26: 13DC *2DC inc, 24DC* repeat from * to* 5 times,2DC Inc, 11DC  (156 DC in total)

Round 27: *2 DC inc, 25 DC* repeat from * to* 6 times (162 DC in total);

Round 28: 14DC *2DC inc, 26DC* repeat from * to* 5 times,2DC Inc, 12DC  (168 DC in total)

Round 29: *2 DC inc, 27 DC* repeat from * to* 6 times (174 DC in total);

Round 30: 15DC *2DC inc, 28DC* repeat from * to* 5 times,2DC Inc, 13DC  (180 DC in total)

Round 31: *2 DC inc, 29 DC* repeat from * to* 6 times (186DC in total);

To Make The Back Continue as Follows

Round 32, 33, 34 & 35: 1 DC in each DC from previous round (186in total); Now you need to work the band that sits under the buttons. This is worked in rows and the stitches are made into both the front and back loop. Row 36, 37, 38 & 39: 55 DC, 1 Ch, turn work; At the end of row 39 fasten off yarn.

To Make the Front Continue as Follows

Make sure you are still working in back loops only. Round 32 & 33: 1 DC in each DC from previous round (186 in total); Round 34: In this round you’ll be creating the button loops. *6CH (for the button loop) 10 DC* from *to* 4 times, then 6 CH. Finish round with 1 DC in each of the remaining DC from round 33. Round 35: *6DC in CH space, 10 DC* from * to * 4 times. 6DC in chain space. Finish round with 1 DC in each of the remaining DC from Round 34. Cut yarn and fasten off end.

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The Front and Back of the Cushion (before making the button band on the back)

To Decorate the Cushion Front

How to make the petals. The numbers refer to points in the instructions below.

How to make the petals. The numbers refer to points in the instructions below.

Change to the Deep Rose yarn and use a 4mm hook. 1. On the cushion front (the one with the button loops) find the center of your spiral. 2. Attach the Deep Rose yarn and make 6CH 3. 1DC in the next stitch of the spiral and 6 CH. 4. Continue the pattern of 1DC and 6CH until you have made a circle of petals.

Where_To_DC

How to skip a round

5. The front loops that you are working into form a continuous spiral from the middle of the cushion all the way to the edge. However, if you were to work petals into every row of front loops the petals would be so densely packed together that the texture would be lost (trust me, I did this and had to pull it all back!). So, once you’ve made one full circle of petals, you’ll need to ‘skip’ one round. To do this, make the 6CH and instead of making 1DC in the next available front loop, make 1 DC in the next front loop but one round out.  Place a stitch marker here, and each time you reach this point, use this technique to move your round of petals one row out. The petals are so lovely and dense that you will not see this ‘jump’ in the finished cushion. Keep working in this manner until you reach the outer edge of the cushion. You’ll have to stop when you come to the first button loop. Cut the yarn and fasten off the end. IMG_1238

Making Up

Sew in all ends. Place the back and the front together, right sides facing with the button loops lining up with the button band. Starting at one edge of the button band, either sew or use single crochet to attach the front to the back. Sew on the buttons to correspond with the button loops. IMG_1246 Sew in the remaining ends and place the cushion pad inside the cushion. It should be a fairly snug fit so that the cushion has a pleasing full, rounded feeling. Sit back, make yourself a cup of tea and enjoy what you’ve made! Let us know what you think or if you need any help, please don’t hesitate to contact us here. IMG_1272

Crochet Circle Tutorial – The Twercle!

I’ve been making a few projects of late that use circles, and getting frustrated with many of the patterns that bill themselves as circles coming out as either hexagons or octagons. I’ve got nothing against either of these shapes, but if I’m making a circle I’d like it to be, well,  circular.

The twercle is on the left, with smooth sides and no obvious corners. A more traditional 'circle' is on the right - which looks more like a hexagon to me!

The twercle is on the left, with smooth sides and no obvious corners. A more traditional ‘circle’ is on the right – which looks more like a hexagon to me!

This got me thinking, there are some basic rules which need to be followed to crochet a flat circle in double crochet (that’s a UK double crochet). The number of stitches needs to increase by 6 in every row – any more than this and it will ripple and not lay flat, any less and it’ll curve up into a shallow bowl shape. Also, the increases need to be done at regular intervals, to make the pattern easy to follow, cut down on the amount of counting that needs to be done and because I’m fairly uptight about things being neat and regular.

So, to date my best offering on a nice, flat cirlce with smooth rounded edges is called the twercle – because it’s got 12 sides but it’s pretending to be a circle (humour me on this one!). All I’m doing is pretty simple – just taking a normal circle pattern but tweaking it a bit so that the increase stitches are spread more evenly. Let me explain…

So, for me, a traditional circle pattern would go as follows working in a spiral.

Just to be clear DC = UK Double Crochet, 2DC inc = work two DC stitches into one stitch on the previous round.

Magic Circle, 1 Chain.
Round 1: 6 DC into magic circle
Round 2: 2DC inc into each DC from Round 1 (12 DC in total)
Round 3: *2DC inc, 1 DC* repleat from * to * 6 times (18 DC in total)
Round 4: *2DC inc, 2 DC* repleat from * to * 6 times (24 DC in total)
Round 5: *2DC inc, 3 DC* repleat from * to * 6 times (30 DC in total)
Round 6: *2DC inc, 4 DC* repleat from * to * 6 times (36 DC in total)
Round 7: *2DC inc, 5 DC* repleat from * to * 6 times (42 DC in total)
Round 8: *2DC inc, 6 DC* repleat from * to * 6 times (48 DC in total)

I work in a spiral and use a stitch marker to mark the last stitch of each round to keep track (without a stitch marker working in a spiral may well drive you nuts).

One of the advantages of working like this is that you always work your increases into the first stitch of your 2 DC inc from the previous round. This means that when you’re working on large projects, there is no real need to count you just keep on with your DC stitches until you spot the increase from the previous round coming up and you know it’s time to put in your increase on the current round.

Now for my twercle plan, it goes like this….

Magic Circle, 1 Chain
Round 1: 6DC into magic circle;

Round 1: Magic Circle with 6DC

Round 1: Magic Circle with 6DC

Round 2: 2 DC inc into each DC from Round 1 (12 DC in total);

Round 2: 2DC inc into each DC from round 1.

Round 2: 2DC inc into each DC from round 1.

Round 3: *2 DC inc, 1 DC* repeat from * to* 6 times (18 DC in total);

Round 3

Round 3

Round 4: 2 DC *2DC inc, 2 DC* repeat from * to* 5 times, 2DC inc (24 DC in total);

Round 4

Round 4

Round 5: *2DC inc, 3DC* repeat from * to * 6 times (30 DC in total)

Round 5

Round 5

Round 6: 3DC *2DC inc, 4DC* repeat from *to* 5 times, 2DC inc, 1DC (36 DC in total)

Round 6

Round 6

Round 7: *2DC inc, 5DC* repeat from *to* 6 times (42 DC in total)

Round 7

Round 7

Round 8: 4DC *2DC inc, 6DC* repeat from * to* 5 times, 2DC inc, 2DC (48 DC in total)

Round 8

Round 8

Round 9: *2DC inc, 7DC* repeat from *to* 6 times (54 Stitches in total).

Round 9

Round 9

So, you’re doing the exactly the same amount of increasing on each round, but by alternating between rounds of starting with the increase and starting with the stated number of DC stitches, you shift where the increase happens creating a smoother sided circle.

The twercle in action!

The twercle in action, smooth sided and lovely 🙂

Let us know what you think or, if you need any help, please do leave a comment here

Wiggly Crochet Cushion Tutorial

Wiggle_Cover_Shot

Wiggly crochet is a technique that has been around for a very long time. Traditionally being used to create pot stands and rugs, as it has a fantastic thick texture, which also makes it perfect for a sumptuous and cosy cushion!

These instructions are for a cushion cover that will measure about 40 x 40 cm.

This cushion uses

  • Drops Karisma Yarn 50g Ball 100% Pure Wool. I used the following colours/quantities
  • 100g Navy (17)
  • 150g Denim Blue (65)
  • 50g Dark Grey Blue (37)
  • 50g Petrol (73)
  • 50g Light Blue Grey (70)
  • 50g Blue Turquiose (60)
  • 50g Grey Purple (64)
  • 4mm crochet hook;
  • 3 Medium buttons approx. 2cm in diameter.
  • 1 40 x 40cm Cushion Pad.
IMG_1028

Lovely, lovely yarn…

This pattern uses UK crochet terms and you will need to know the following stitches:

  • Chain stitch (CH);
  • Treble Crochet (TR);
  • Slip stitch (SS);

IMG_1184

Cushion Front

Wiggly crochet looks very free form and flowing, but looks can be deceptive! It is based on a grid pattern that makes the base of your work, which you then add your wiggles to.

 

 Make Your Grid

  • For this wiggly crochet cushion you will need 27 squares, so crochet 86 chain in Navy (17).
  • 1 TR in the 8th chain from your hook;
  • *2 CH, skip 2 CH on your base chain, TR in next chain*
  • Repeat from * to * along your base chain until you reach the end. Check at this stage that you have created 27 squares;
  • 5 Chain and turn your work;
  • TR in the next TR of the row below, 2 CH, TR in the next TR, continue until the last TR then 2 CH and a TR in the 3rd chain of your 5 turning chain.
  • Keep going until you have a square grid of 27 rows and 27 columns.
  • Don’t worry if the finished grid is much smaller than 40 x 40 cm, the grid will grow as you work into it.
  • IMG_1027

    The grid will look much smaller than the cushion pad – don’t panic, it will grow as you work your wiggles into it.

 

How to Wiggle….

The cushion front is made up of the base grid, with clusters of 3 treble crochet worked into each 2 chain space or treble crochet.

how_to_wiggle2

 

1. Here is the base grid, you will be starting at the dot and working around in the direction of the arrows.

2. Attach the yarn and crochet 3 CH(this counts as your first treble) crochet two more TR in the same space.

3. Turn 90 degrees, crochet 3 TR in this space.

4. Once again turn 90 degrees and crochet 3 TR in this space.

5. To finish this small wiggle, turn 90 degrees for one final time and 3 TR in the space. To finish the wiggle, slip stitch into the 3rd of your initial 3 CH. For larger wiggles, use the same method but turning a 90 degree corner after every cluster of 3 TR make what ever shapes you like!

wiggly crochet grid pattern

IMG_1178

This is how the back of your wiggly will look

 

You can either follow the image here  or if you follow these guidelines you can make up your own. I recommend you go for it and make up your own abstract pattern – it’s lots easier than you might think and it will make the design your own. Just plan ahead, either on paper or in your head and follow the guidelines below and get wiggling!

Wiggly lines for you to follow

Wiggly lines for you to follow

  • Draw out your design on paper first.
  • Always make sure you plan your design so that you are working trebles into the corner squares of your grid.
  • Start filling in the corner of your grid and work your wiggles out from here.
  • Never work in a straight line on the base grid – make sure you turn a 90 degree corner after every cluster of 3TR. If you don’t stick to this rule you’ll find yourself at a wiggly dead end!
  • If you make a big wiggly shape, fill in the middle with other wiggles.
IMG_1090

The base grid will grow and stretch as you work your wiggles into it.

IMG_1196

Cushion Back

The cushion back is worked in stripes of treble crochet in two halves as follows.

  • For the back I have alternated between stripes of Denim Blue (65) and a random selection of all the other colours. This way it uses up all the left over yarn, and as long as you keep the stripes random, if you run out of one colour, no one will ever know!!
  • **I would suggest here that you work in as many of the yarn ends as you go to save you having to sew them in at the end**
  • With the right side of the cushion front facing away from you, take a look at the edge of the wiggly crochet. You’ll see clusters of 3 TR alternating with chain spaces.
  • Using Demin Blue (65) and starting at the corner square, work 3 CH (this counts as your first TR) and 1 TR  placing the stitches between the trebles of wiggly (see picture below). For every chain space work 3 TR, and for every 3 treble cluster of the wiggly crochet work 2 TR placing the stitches in between the TR of the wiggly front. This will give you a total of 67 stitches.

    edge

    Work a treble crochet where the arrows show.

  • Change colour, turn work, 3 CH (this counts as your first treble) and then work 1 TR in each TR from previous row.
  • Work 26 rows.
IMG_1201

Working the back of the cushion onto the front makes a neat join.

For the second half of the back

  • With the right side of the cushion front facing away from you starting at the opposite edge, take a look at the edge of the wiggly crochet. You’ll see clusters of 3 TR alternating with chain spaces.
  • Using Demin Blue (65) and starting at the corner square, work 3 CH (this counts as your first TR) and 1 TR  placing the stitches between the trebles of wiggly (see picture as above). For every chain space work 3 TR, and for every 3 treble cluster of the wiggly crochet, work 2 TR placing the stitches in between the TR of the wiggly front. This will give you a total of 67 stitches.
  • Changing colours with each row, work 22 rows.
  • To make the button band, change to Denim Blue (65) 2 CH (counts as first DC) and work 1 DC in each TR from the previous row.
  • Work 3 more rows of DC;
  • To make the button holes 2CH, (count s as first DC) *14 DC, 3 chain, skip 3 DC from previous row* repeat from * to * 2 more times. 14 DC to finish row.
  • On the next row, 2CH (counts as first DC) work 1 DC in each DC and CH from previous round (67 in total).
  • Work 2 more rows of DC, fasten off yarn.
IMG_1179

Cushion front and the two halves of the back.

Making Up

  • Sew in all the yarn ends.
  • Using Demin Blue (65) and a large eye needle slip stitch the back of the cushion to the front. Make sure that the half of the back with the button band is sewn to over lap the other half of the back to make an envelope opening.
  • Sew on the buttons to correspond with the button holes.
  • Place your cover onto the cushion pad and sit back and admire! Make yourself a nice cup of tea and give yourself a pat on the back!

For any pattern support or clarification, please don’t hesitate to contact us! x We’d love to hear what you think – leave a comment here.

IMG_1193

 

Spiral Pebble Cushion Tutorial

Inspired by pebbles on the beach, this is the perfect cushion for lazy summer days outside.

 

Spiral_Cushion

This cushion uses:

  • 2 balls of Patons Wool Blend Aran in grey;
  • a small amount of Debbie Bliss Rialto Lace in Cyclamen;
  • a 5mm hook;
  • a 2.5mm hook for the lace weight yarn;
  • 2 stitch markers;
  • 4 buttons;
  • large sewing needle;
  • 18” circular cushion pad;

This pattern uses UK crochet terms and you will need to know the following stitches:

  • chain (CH)
  • double crochet (DC)
  • Double Crochet Increase (2DC inc) = work 2 double crochet into one stitch.
  • working in back loop only.

This cushion is worked in a continuous spiral, so make sure you use a stitch marker on the last stitch of every Row to keep track of where you are!

 

Make cushion front

Row 1
Make a magic circle. (If you’re not familiar with this technique, you can find a great tutorial on how to do it here)
CH 1, then 6 DC into the circle. Place a stitch marker in the first and last DC.

Work six double crochet into the magic circle. On this round I like to use a stitch marker in the first and last double crochet to help me keep track of where I am.

Work six double crochet into the magic circle. On this round I like to use a stitch marker in the first and last double crochet to help me keep track of where I am.

Row 2
From this point onwards, for the rest of the pattern, work ONLY IN THE BACK LOOPS (this will leave the front loops free to add the spiral colour later)
2 DC inc each DC from Row 1 (total 12 stitches). Move stitch marker to last DC.

backloop

Make sure you are only working into the back loop of each stitch.

 

Row 2 working into the back loop of the stitches from row 1.

Row 2 working into the back loop of the stitches from row 1.

Row 3
*2 DC inc in next DC, then 1DC in next DC from Row 2*, repeat from * to * 6 times (18 stitches). Move stitch marker to last DC.

Row 4
*2DC inc in next DC, then 1DC in next 2 stitches from Row 3*, repeat from * to * 6 times (24 stitches). Move stitch marker to last DC.

Row 5
*2DC inc in next DC, then 1DC in next 3 stitches from Row 4*, repeat from * to * 6 times (30 stitches). Move stitch marker to last DC.

Row 6-29
Repeat in same pattern, starting each row of the spiral with a 2DC inc, then one extra DC per row (so that row 6 will be 2 DC inc, 1 DC in next 4 stitches and row 7 will be 2 DC inc, 1 DC in next 5 stitches).

At row 29 you should have 2DC inc, DC in next 31 stitches repeated 6 times and a total of 198 stitches.

You may at this point wish to block your work if it is not laying flat.

Row 30 – 32
1DC in each stitch (198 stitches)

Row 33
Make button holes
*1DC in next 11 stitches, 2CH, skip 2 stitches*, repeat from * to * 4 times. 1DC in each stitch to the end of the Row. (198 stitches)

Row 34
1DC in each stitch (198 stitches). Fasten off yarn.

Make cushion back

Make as front until Row 32

Row 33 – 34
1DC in each stitch (198 stitches). Do not fasten off.

Make button flap
This part of the pattern is worked in rows.

Row 35
Continuing from the end of Row 34, work 66 DC, 1 CH and turn work.

Row 36
1 DC in each of the 66 DC from Row 35. 1 CH and turn work.

Row 37
As Row 36, but fasten off at end of Row.

Front Spiral Pattern

 

IMG_1094

Round and round and round….

Take the front piece of your cushion. Because you have worked all of your rows previously in the back loop only, you’ll see that the front loops are all creating a lovely ridged spiral, which we’re now going to use to work the pattern.

Using the lace weight yarn, work 2 double crochet into each of the front loops that form the spiral.

Using the lace weight yarn, work 2 double crochet into each of the front loops that form the spiral.

Find the first of the front loops in the centre of your spiral and attach your lace weight yarn, using your 2.5mm hook.

Now simply work 2 DC into each of these raised front loops. Continue to work out and round until you are happy with the size of your spiral. We have worked out 30 rows in total.

Assemble the cushion

Place the right sides of the front and back portions together, making sure that you carefully align the button flap and button holes. Pin into place.

Using the Aran yarn and a large needle, sew the two sides together, leaving an opening for the button flap.

Turn your cushion right way out, place your buttons to correspond with the button holes and sew on using the lace weight yarn to create a lovely contrast.

IMG_1107

Add the buttons to finish off the cushion

Sew in all ends, place your cushion pad inside the cover, do up the buttons and admire your handiwork, then make a cup of tea and have a nice little sit down!

If you need any pattern support, just drop us a line and we’ll be happy to help.

IMG_1109

Finished cushion and sunshine – perfect!